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Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Patterns - Blue Wing Olives "Baetis"

I've always wanted to put it all together, the bugs, the flies and the techniques to fish them. The Fly Fishing Traditions blog is sort of my Masters Thesis in Fly Fishing. Kinda, Sorta! For me it's a quest of learning about the entomology, the fly patterns to match the hatch and the necessary techniques to play the game effectively. Done in a everyday workman's or tradesman's type way and along the way having fun with it.

This blog entry, "Patterns - Blue Wing Olives Baetis" is my attempt to cover the fly patterns portion of the equation. I am hoping to follow this up with future blog entries to cover the bugs as the season progresses, Skwalas, PMD's etc. But as always life gets in the way so we'll see how it goes.

So, this is the follow up to the blog post “Bugs – The Baetis - Blue Wing Olives” with a selection of patterns that will cover the hatch. This of course is by no means the only patterns that are available for the BWO, Baetis hatch, but will give me and hopefully others a good idea how to set up a fly box to match it. Read some John Gierach stories about him and A.K. Best fishing the BWO hatch, one of his favorite hatches and you'll get a good insight too.

I have researched and provided some patterns and recipes with brief comments on when and how to fish the patterns.

I hope that you will find these patterns useful and when you're on the river when a BWO hatch comes off, you'll be prepared. I know I’d like to find some time to tie some of these patterns up myself. Maybe soon!

I did most of my research on the internet and at http://www.westfly.com/ which is a great site. Check it out for specific tying techniques and steps for most of the patterns listed herein. A great tying instruction book is "Tying Dries" by Randall Kaufman. It's sort of my bible for tying.

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Hogan Brown's Patterns

When I look into my flyboxes and I think about what fly to reach for and which one's that I have the most confidence in, I often choose one of Hogan' Brown's patterns. Hogan learned and perfected his craft right here on the Lower Yuba River. So when trying to match a Baetis, BWO, why wouldn't I not go for one of his following patterns? I usually go there first and there is a reason that I have confidence in them. They work. I haven't been able to locate tying instructions for most of his patterns but his flies are distributed through "Iydlewilde Flies" and are available at Nevada City Anglers, The Fly Shop and most other resources on line.


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Hogan's S&M Nymph



Hook: TMC 3769 #16-18
Thread: Dark Brown 8/0
Weight: Copper Bead
Ribbing: Wapsi Olive Ultra Wire, SM
Abdomen: Olive Thread 8/0
Tail: Pheasant Tail Fibers
Wingcase: Dark Brown Goose Biot
Thorax: Dark Olive Antron
Legs: Olive Krystal Flash


Notes: I first started using the S&M Nymph when fishing the Lower Sacramento River and it has been a proven producer. When the Lower Sac goes into the small bug bite mode I usually have an S&M nymph or a Military May nymph rigged up. From what I have researched the S&M nymph is weighted by use of a Copper bead head but has additional sinking capabilities through the use of a thread body, streamline shape, and Ultra wire for the distinct segmentation. Hogan uses a Goose Biot for the wingcase which provides a distinct color contrast to the thorax which is typical with natural baetis nymphs having a darker hue on the top of the thorax. Krystal Flash is used for the legs which provides attraction and movement to the fly yet does not detract from it's sinkability. I've often used it as a dropper on the Lower Sac and Lower Yuba when I need to get the nymph down quickly. __________________________________


Hogan's Military May


Hogan's Military May has a more slender profile than the S&M nynph. It's a great idea to catch some baetis nymphs from your screen need when sampling, put them in a white jar lid and then stick your S&M nymph and Military May or Better Baetis nymph in and see which profile matches the natural best. You might be surprised.





Hogan's Better Baetis - I believe that this matches the smallest BWO the best.






Hogan's BWO Sipper

The Hogan's BWO Sipper has also been productive during the BWO hatches when the nymphs are emerging and when you have duns riding the surface.




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Proven Dry Fly Patterns for the BWO, "Baetis"


Parachute Baetis

HOOK: 900BL, sizes 16-20
THREAD: Olive
WING: Mallard flank, tied parachute style
TAIL: Two blue dun Micro Fibbets, split
BODY: Olive Haretron or Superfine
HACKLE: Natural or olive-dyed grizzly


When to Use - Use parachute style flies to ride low in the water and provide a realistic silhouette on runs and glides. Use this fly during hatches of blue-winged olive (Baetis) mayflies when you are matching the dun stage.

Variations - Vary the size and body color to match whatever is hatching. Body colors will range from olive, to brown-olive, to brown. As always a good idea catch a sample to match color.

How to Fish - Dress the fly with floatant and use standard dry fly presentations.
Size counts. During a hatch, try to snag a natural insect, then pick a parachute pattern that is the same size. As Rick Hafele says it's the most important trigger.

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Sparkle Dun
Created by Craig Mathews and John Juracek

HOOK: TMC 100, sizes 16-20
THREAD: Yellow (Olive to match the BWO)
WING: Deer hair, dyed gray. When done tying, flare the wing so it forms an upright semi-circle over the fly.
TAIL: Tan Z-lon, not too thick, (Dun or Olive for the BWO)
BODY: Pale yellow Superfine ( Olive to match natural for the BWO)

Note: The photo below is to match a PMD, Match the colors of the BWO.

Uses - The sparkle dun imitates a hatching mayfly dun. Use this pattern during a hatch when the duns are on the water and trout are feeding on them. The Sparkle Dun is one of the most useful styles to learn to tie. It is not a difficult pattern to master, and it catches fish. Essentially, the fly is a Comparadun with a Z-lon tail that represents the shuck the dun has just emerged from. It's a clever and deadly variation. Craig Matthews should know!


Why does it work so well? Because a dun that has just emerged from the shuck has to dry its wings before it can fly off; thus, it will be on the water for the maximum amount of time. If you were a trout, which mayfly dun would you prefer: one that might fly away before you sip it down, or one that is guaranteed to still be there after you spend the energy to reach it?

Variations - A useful variation is the CDC Sparkle Dun, which uses CDC fibers for the wing. This latter variation is sometimes tied with a mallard flank wing in front of the CDC, but they say that the trout don’t care if the mallard flank is there or not.
This dressing imitates a hatching PMD. To imitate other mayfly duns, vary the size and color.

How to Fish - Dress the fly with floatant and use standard dry fly presentations.


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Comparadun
Created by Al Caucci and Bob Nastasi

HOOK: 900BL, size 12-16, (16 to 20 for BWO)
THREAD: Brown (Olive for the BWO)
WING: Mottled gray deer hair tied upright and flared
TAIL: Blue dun hackle fibers, split
BODY: Tan Superfine or to match dun color (Olive to match naturals for the BWO)

Uses - Comparaduns are useful, durable patterns that imitate the dun stage of mayflies. Use them during a hatch when duns are on the water and are being taken by trout. Comparaduns ride well and float without hackle, which is an advantage on slow, quiet stretches of water. The pattern is more durable than a No Hackle, but it's not as effective on spring creeks.


Variations - Other mayflies can be imitated by using hook sizes and body colors that match the natural insect.


How to Fish - Dress the fly with floatant and use standard dry fly presentations.


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Thorax, Olive
Check out Randal Kaufmann's "Dry Flies" for tying instructions.

HOOK: TMC 100, sizes 14-20
THREAD: Black
WING: White hackle tips
TAIL: Dun hackle or Betts' Tailing Fibers
BODY: Superfine to match natural insect
HACKLE: Light dun. Clip the bottom so it rides flush in the surface film.

Uses - Thorax-style dry flies provide a realistic silhouette and were designed to be used on spring creeks and other slow, clear water situations. Use this pattern during hatches of small mayflies when the duns are on the water.


Variations - Vary the color and hook size to match other mayflies.



How to Fish - Dress the fly with floatant and use standard dry fly presentations. The fly is intended for slow, smooth flows; it will not float well in rough water.

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CDC Baetis
Created by Dave Hill

HOOK: TMC 100, sizes 16-20
THREAD: Olive
TAIL: Betts' Tailing Fibers
BODY: Olive Dazl-Tron
WING: CDC, natural dun color

Uses - Use to imitate blue-winged olive (Baetis) duns when there is a hatch in progress and trout are taking duns from the surface. Because this fly has no hackle, it is particularly effective on slow water, spring creeks, and other situations where trout are acting in a persnickity manner.



Variations - Blue-winged olives come in body colors that range from olive to brown. Choose a color that matches the insects available to trout when and where you are fishing.


How to Fish - Do NOT dress the fly with floatant! CDC flies should be fished au natural. When a fly no longer floats well, put it in a small container of powdered descicant, such as Dry Shake, and shake it up. This removes the moisture, and you're ready to cast again. Use standard dry fly presentations.

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Proven Nymph Patterns


Pale Baetis Nymph
Created by Jeff Morgan

HOOK: Dai Riki 310, size 20-22
THREAD: 8/0 rusty dun
TAIL: Three short widgeon flank feathers
ABDOMEN: Tying thread, perhaps counter-ribbed with iron gray 8/0 thread
THORAX: One or two wraps of pale olive dubbing
WINGCASE: Mottled oak Thinskin
LEGS: Pale olive Antron fibers, sparse

Uses -Imitates nymphs of blue-winged olives.

How to Fish - In rivers, the fly can be presented near the surface, but it is usually most productive when fished near the bottom on a dead drift with the indicator or tight line presentations. To achieve the right depth, you may need to put weight on the leader or use the fly on a dropper with a heavier fly on the point. While the fly works well as a searching nymph, it can also be productive during a hatch (more trout than you might suspect are taking nymphs off the bottom rather than duns off the top).

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Hot Spot Pheasant Tail

HOOK: Mustad 9671, sizes 8-20
THREAD: Brown
TAIL: Four pheasant tail fibers
RIB: Fine copper wire
BODY: Pheasant tail fibers wrapped on hook
THORAX: Orange or chartreuse Haretron or sparkle dubbing
WINGCASE: Pheasant tail fibers pulled over the thorax


Uses - The bright thorax may help fish focus on this variation of the traditional Pheasant Tail Nymph. "Hot spots" such as this bright thorax may not be as unnatural as they might appear.





Variations - Can be tied with or without a beadhead. Vary the size to match different insect species.

How to Fish - In rivers, the fly can be presented near the surface, but it is usually most productive when fished near the bottom on a dead drift with the indicator or tight line presentations.

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Proven Emerger and Cripple Patterns

Baetis Cripple
Created by Bob Quigley

HOOK: 1X Fine wire, Standard shank, Turned-Down eye; e.g., TMC 100 or equivalent; sizes 16-20
THREAD: Brown
TAIL: Pheasant tail fibers
ABDOMEN: Wrapped pheasant tail fibers
THORAX: Olive or brown Superfine dubbing
WING: Tan deer hair
HACKLE: Olive grizzly


Uses - "Cripple" patterns represent mayflies that are either just emerging or that got stuck in the shuck while emerging. In either case, the insect isn't going anywhere soon. Trout recognize this vulnerable condition and feed eagerly on cripples when they see them. When you're confronted with a blizzard hatch, where your fly is one small speck among hundreds or thousands of natural insects, a cripple pattern is a great way to induce trout to take your fake.
This dressing is in the "Quigley" style and represents a crippled blue-winged olive (Baetis) mayfly.



Variations -Blue-winged olives come in body colors that range from olive to brown. Choose a color that matches the insects available to trout when and where you are fishing.

How to Fish -Dress the front half of the fly (only) with floatant and use standard dry fly presentations

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Baetis Marabou Cripple

Created by Bob Quigley

Materials:
Hook: TMC 2302, #8-10
Thread: Olive 6/0
Tail: 3 Olive Emu Fibers
Wing: Yellow Dyed Deer Hair
Abdomen: Olive Marabou
Ribbing: Single Strand of Dark Green Floss
Thorax: Deer Hair
Hackle: Light Grey Hackle


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Barrs Emerger


John Barr created this pattern in 1975 while fishing upon the Nelson's Spring Creek in Montana. Noticing that he was getting little interest in a PMD hatch with his dry patterns, he used a nymph and finally caught a trout. Upon pumping the stomach, John noticed that partially hatched nymphs with the shuck still attached were present on the back of the trout's tongue. John developed his emerger pattern based upon the appearance of these partially developed nymphs and created his "Barr's Emerger".


Materials:
Hook: TMC 106TC #16-24
Thread: Olive 8/0
Abdomen: Brown/Olive Dubbing with Antron mixed
Tail: Brown Hackle Fibers
Thorax: PMD Superfine
Wingcase: Dun Hackle Fibers




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CDC Bubble Emerger

HOOK: Dai Riki 135, sizes 18-22
TAIL: Pheasant tail fibers
RIBBING (OPTIONAL): Fine brass
ABDOMEN: Pheasant Tail fibers wrapped on hook
WING: Bubble of CDC. Use white for tricos or PMDs, dun for others
OVERWING: 1-3 strands of pearl Krystalflash
THORAX: Dubbing to match natural


Uses - Many blue-winged olive (Baetis) spinners dive or crawl underwater to lay their eggs. This fly imitates those spinners, and fishes well when you see lots of adults flying around but you can't get trout to take your dun imitations. A beautiful pattern, you'll these just for the pleasure of it. But don't forget to cast them!


Variations - Blue-winged olives vary slightly in color from olive to brown, depending on species, location, and time of year. Try to match the size and color of the natural insects, but remember that size is more important than color. If you want, you can add a pearl bead in the thorax.


How to Fish - Use indicator or tight line nymphing tactics.

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Diving Baetis Spinner


HOOK: Dai Riki 310 or 305, size 16-22
TAILS: Dun Microfibetts
EGG SAC: Bright yellow dubbing
BODY: Olive-brown turkey biot or olive-brown dubbing
WING: Z-wing or tan Raffia, tied back and clipped to shape
HACKLE: One-and-half wraps of starling


Uses -Many blue-winged olive (Baetis) spinners dive or crawl underwater to lay their eggs. This fly imitates those spinners, and fishes well when you see lots of adults flying around but you can't get trout to take your dun imitations.A beautiful pattern, you'll these just for the pleasure of it. But don't forget to cast them!


Variations -Blue-winged olives vary slightly in color from olive to brown, depending on species, location, and time of year. Try to match the size and color of the natural insects, but remember that size is more important than color. If you want, you can add a pearl bead in the thorax.


How to Fish - Use indicator or tight line nymphing tactics.

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Proven Spinner Pattern


CDC Biot Spinner

HOOK: 1X Fine wire, Standard shank, Turned-Down eye; e.g., TMC 100 or equivalent; sizes 16-20
THREAD: Olive
UNDERWING: Light blue dun CDC, tied spread-eagled (spinner style)
OVERWING: Light blue dun Z-lon
TAIL: Light blue dun Betts' Tailing Fibers. Use 2-4 and split them.
ABDOMEN: Olive turkey biot
THORAX: Medium olive or olive-brown Superfine


Uses -Use to imitate mayfly spinners when the natural spinners are on the water and trout are taking them from the surface.


Variations -This dressing is for a blue-winged olive mayfly spinner. Other mayflies can be imitated by using hook sizes and body colors that match the natural insect.








How to Fish - Do NOT dress the fly with floatant! CDC flies should be fished au natural. When a fly no longer floats well, put it in a small container of powdered descicant, such as Dry Shake, and shake it up. This removes the moisture, and you're ready to cast again. Use standard dry fly presentations.


Hen Spinner, Blue Quill
Created by Mike Lawsen


HOOK: TMC 100, sizes 12-18
THREAD: Gray
WING: Light blue dun hen hackle tips, tied spread-eagled
TAIL: Blue dun hackle fibers, split
BODY: Blue-dyed hackle feather stem
HACKLE: Blue dun, clipped top and bottom

Uses - When trout are sipping the spinner stage of mayflies, this can be an effective pattern. Tied in the right sizes, this dressing imitates the spinner stage of many blue-winged olives and most blue duns. The wings should lie flat on the water. Check out additional photos of this fly pattern at http://www.westfly.com/



Variations - The Rusty Spinner, which imitates the spinner stage of many blue-winged olive mayflies, is tied on size 14-18 hooks with a dubbed body of rust-brown Superfine. Vary the size and colors to match other mayfly spinners.

How to Fish - Dress the fly with floatant (be careful of the wings) and use standard dry fly presentations.


1 comment:

  1. I absolutly like your blog and I am your newest follower..been learning the hogan's patterns lately, thats how I found your blog. feel free to visit me www.bigerrfish.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete

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